Japanese

Shoji Nishikata

Name Shoji Nishikata
Position Professor
Degree(s) B. Eng. and M. Eng. degrees from Tokyo Denki University and the D. Eng. degree from Tokyo Institute of Technology
Main Subjects Electric Circuit Theory and Practice II
Electric Machinery II
Environment and Energy
Engineering English II
Yoshihiko Horio
Specialty Electric Machines
Power Electronics
Field of Research Control of Rotating Machines
UPSs
Wind Turbine Generating Systems
Academic Society IEEE
IEEJ
Short Curriculum Vitae He received the B. Eng. and M. Eng. degrees from Tokyo Denki University (TDU), Tokyo, JAPAN, in 1972 and 1975, respectively, and the D. Eng. degree from Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT), Tokyo, JAPAN, in 1984. From 1975 to 1984 he was with TIT as Research Associate. In 1984 he joined TDU, where he is currently Professor.
Mail

Selected Papers

  • F. Tatsuta, and S. Nishikata: Studies on a hybrid wind turbine generating system using a current-source thyristor inverter, IEEJ Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. 132, no. 9 pp. 875–883, September 2012.
  • T. Teshirogi and S. Nishikata: Effects of System Parameters on the Performance Characteristics of a Wind Turbine Generating System Using a Current–Source Thyristor Inverter, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 252–257, 2011-1/2.
  • S. Nishikata and F. Tatsuta: Studies on a wind turbine generating system that employs a thyristor inverter, IEEJ Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. 130-D, no. 4, vol. 130-D, pp. 407–414, 2010-4.
  • S. Nishikata and F. Tatsuta: A New Interconnecting Method for Wind Turbine/Generators in a Wind Farm and Basic Performances of the Integrated System, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 468–475, 2010-1/2.
  • C. Hasegawa, S. Nishikata: A Sensorless Starting Method for Self-Controlled Synchronous Motors, IEEJ Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. 128-D, pp. 1381–1387, 2008-12.

Laboratory Introduction

In recent years, each country in the world has struggled against the global worming. Since wind is one of renewable resources of energy, we have proposed a novel wind power generator system. In May 2006 we introduced a 40-kW wind turbine generator system, which is of practical scale and is equipped with the power converter proposed in our laboratory, in TDU Chiba-Newtown campus. Various performances of this system are being investigated for any wind conditions. Moreover, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive systems are one of our major research projects since PMSMs have many features such as high efficiency and long life. Also, our research interests include a shaft generator system used for electrical power sources in large ships, and parallel operation of uninterruptible power supply systems (UPSs) for computers.

Green Energy Laboratory

Laboratory Web Page

Back to Top